Audiobook Review

The Man Who Watched the World End

By: Chris Dietzel
Narrated by: Ray Chase
Series: The Great De-evolution
Length: 7 hrs and 28 mins
Unabridged Audiobook
Release date: 07-06-16
Language: English
Publisher: Podium Audio

The Great De-evolution, #1
By
Chris Dietzel
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Performance
Overall
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Excellent, Unforgettable, Best of the nest

Very good, thoroughly enjoyed, 

Good, Solid, Enjoyed many aspects

STAR RATINGS GUIDE

A Melancholy Swan Song Worth A Listen

THE BIRDICT

🧡 This is a sad and difficult story, but one which opens up many a fascinating thought wormhole. Amongst these are existential questions about quality of life and the nature of family. If you like grappling with such mind mazes, I high recommend this. It is also an incredibly moving account of brotherly love.

💚 Having said all that, this is about the most depressing thing I have ever heard. I won’t be listening to the sequel. I have confidence in Dietzel’s writing and am sure it will be equally fascinating, but I can’t do this again.

Content warning for a lot (just so much) animal suffering. To be fair, most of the violence is animal on animal, but it’s tough.

I listened to this for free on Audible Plus.

SQUAWKING THE TALK

🎧 Ray Chase has lent his gravelly voice box to many sci-fi titles and he is, as always, excellent. Expressive and likeable and engaging.

🎧 If you’re looking for a relaxing escapism, this is not it. Between the general hopelessness and animal animosity, this is pretty much a downer. BUT it’s easy to follow and, at just under 7.5 hours, is not a massive commitment.

BIRDS OF A FEATHER: SIMILAR AUDIOBOOKS

No spoiler for this one. Maybe next time!
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The Man Who Watched the World End

By: Chris Dietzel
Narrated by: Ray Chase
Series: The Great De-evolution
Length: 7 hrs and 28 mins
Unabridged Audiobook
Release date: 07-06-16
Language: English
Publisher: Podium Audio

THE BLURB

The end of man was not signaled by marauding gangs or explosions but with silence. People simply grew older knowing a younger generation would not be there to replace them. The final two residents in the neighborhood of Camelot, an old man and his invalid brother, are trapped in their house by forests full of cats and dogs battling with the bears and wolves to eat anything they can find. As the man struggles to survive, he recounts all the ways society changed as the human population continued to shrink.